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Which color fits your business personality?

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By Kristina Celin on November 16, 2016

Color matters. A lot. 

Like, it’s kind of a big deal.

Research has shown color can impact how potential customers perceive your business and its products and services.

It can even encourage or discourage them from taking action.

Cue Google and the 41 shades of blue episode. You know, as in that time back in 2009 where the company invested time and money researching the exact color code combination that was most effective in making users click on text ads.

All of this suggests color can directly impact your bottom line and is one of those critical elements to meditate on thoroughly.

So don’t just spin the color wheel of fortune, if you get my drift.

Choose colors that reflect the personality traits you want your brand to have in the eyes of your customer.

For example, if you want to be perceived as reliable, then blue is a great choice.

Glam… go purple. Modern and fun…. consider yellow.

Choose wisely, my friends, for every color carries meaning along with it.

Now let’s look at each color individually…

 

Red

What it says about your business: Energetic, Exciting, Motivating, Passionate

It makes people: Take action, Feel hungry

Used effectively in: Fast food, Grocery stores, News channels, Video gaming

Brand examples: McDonald’s, Coca Cola, Target, CNN, Nintendo

 

Pink

What it says about your business: Empathetic, Nurturing, Romantic, Hopeful

It makes people: Feel attractive, Promote a cause, Feel feminine

Used effectively in: Social campaigns, Cosmetics, Salons, Fashion, Candy stores

Brand examples: Barbie, Breast Cancer Awareness, Victoria’s Secret, Benefit

* Bright pink = teenage girls market

* Dull pink = middle aged to older market

 

Orange

What it says about your business: Cheerful, Warm, Creative, Risk-taking

It makes people: Feel hungry, Feel young and adventurous, Play sports

Used effectively in: Fast food and Diners, Travel websites, Sports teams

Brand examples: Orange Julius, easyJet.com, Harley Davidson, Fanta, Nickelodeon, Broncos

 

Yellow

What it says about your business: Modern, Optimistic, Original, Communication-oriented, Analytical, Clear vision

It makes people: Cheerful, Playful, Inspired, Think logically

Used effectively in: Communications, Children products, Lifestyle products, Safety

Brand examples: Snapchat, Nikon, Forever 21, Sprint, National Geographic, IKEA, Best Buy

 

Green

What it says about your business: Social, Forward-thinking, Healthy, Environmentally-conscious

It makes people: GO!, Think about potential, Feel healthy

Used effectively in: Financial companies, Organic products, Technology and Apps

Brand examples: Whole Foods, WhatsApp, Android, John Deere, BP, Starbucks, Subway, Xbox

* Lime green = New & fresh with potential

 

Blue

What it says about your business: Reliable, Intelligent, Loyal, Responsible, Professional

It makes people: Trust you

Used effectively in: Technology, Medical Industry, Politics, Legal, Accounting, Travel

Brand examples: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, IBM, Dell, Ford, Blue Cross Blue Shield

 

Purple

What it says about your business: Sophisticated with good taste, High-quality, Royal, Majestic

It makes people: Feel glamorous and charming

Used effectively in: High-end products especially for women, Fashion, Handcrafts

Brand examples: Hallmark, Aussie, Cadbury, Colorado Rockies, Curves, Yahoo!

 

Gray

Gray usually gets minimum attention. No one talks about it much, likely because it is so neutral and lacks the energy that the others colors have. But I feel it has its place in the world of color selection. Gray is a “safe” color that works great when combined with other stronger colors. For example, blue + gray = credible. Gold + gray = high-quality. Turquoise + gray = high-tech. Going silver is also an option. Think: Audi and Apple.

 

Brown

What it says about your business: Practical, Dependable, Natural, Earthy

It makes people: Comfortable and feel homely

Used effectively in: Chocolate and other comfort foods, organic wholesome agricultural products, Outdoor services or products.

Brand examples: UPS, m&m’s, Blue Bell, Gloria Jean’s Coffees, Nutiva

 

Black

What it says about your business: Sophisticated, Authoritative, Expensive

It makes people: Feel chic and mysterious; strong and in control

Used effectively in: Expensive high-end products like luxury cars and fashion

Brand examples: Lamborghini, CHANEL, Jaguar, Hugo Boss, Gucci

 

White

In terms of color usage and particularly for logos, it is always important to have a white version of your logo. White, the equal balance of all the colors of the spectrum, carries with it connotations of cleanliness, simplicity and openness. Plus, practically speaking, it’s so versatile that you can use it with ANYTHING… as in, your white logo can go against any color background, or any photo you like.

 

To drive the point home, we’ve put together this graphic of big brand logos organized by color.

logos-by-color-graphic

 

So, tell me in the comments below. What colors best fit YOUR business personality??

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Kristina Celin

About the author

Kristina Celin President & Creative Director Kristina has relished in all things creative since a very young age. Over time, her interest in drawing on canvases evolved into something much larger: producing unique digital graphics, logos and websites for others — eventually leading her to open her own creative agency, Designing Gig, in 2009. Today, Designing Gig proudly serves clients from U.S. coast-to-coast and beyond. To Kristina, the core of great design is communicating a message in a simple way. And with 10+ years of experience in the creative business, no matter how complex the project, she will always return to square one and ask: "Are we getting across what we need to get across here?" Kristina is certified in Website Design & Development and holds a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication from UW—Madison. She has acquired an extensive background in communications, branding, website development, and marketing — but her real passion is putting her intricate knowledge of digital solutions and industry trends to good use by helping businesses of all sizes create professional, high-impact brand experiences that are strategically aligned with their business goals.

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